Charles Alfred Daulphin & George Trott—- Followed their Sports dreams

Very often we have personalities in our midst that we seldom speak about and once passed on we seldom think about. So I take this opportunity to record in history a brief outline of the life of these two persons in the sports arena of Bermuda. Charles Alfred Daulphin was born on  15th of September 1936 in the Frizwell’s Pond Hill Area.He was educated at Ms. Galleons School and Elliott Primary school  in Devonshire. He later joined his father Joseph in the family Construction business. He spent several years with the firm and this provided him with the skills that would serve him in later life. As his life progressed Charles along with his life long friend Mr. William Minors established the International Sports Shop on Bermudiana Road in Hamilton which became a thriving enterprise.  Charles attended the Grace Methodist Church in Pembroke where he attended Sunday School and sang in the choir. He was an avid sportsman and was haled    as one of the most exciting players to grace the annual summer Classic ‘CUP MATCH”‘  He was an excellent batsman, fielder and one of the islands most feared pace bowlers in his heyday. He was definitely a team player.  His Cup Match years covered from 1956-1967. During those years he scored some 405 runs and his highest score being 67. He had a partnership in one Cup match with Sherdian  Raynor in 1964 when between them they made 166 runs. Sherdian was a well-known member of the Raynor family of Southampton and joined several of his family members in the sport of cricket. Charles also played football  with the Pembroke Juniors in October of 1951 playing as a center forward now described in modern-day terms as striker’ he also player right full back . He developed into one of the islands best defenders. He was a keen competitor who played his game clean and hard. and proved to be a no nonsense defender with a powerful kick. He was a credit to sports and a fine example of sportsmanship.

Charles A. Dulphin  Today players would do well to emulate his gentlemanly conduct. He earned the highest respect as a gentleman and sports personality.

Joining Charles is another man who had gained the respect of his peers in the sports arena and his community. George Trott born on 8th June 1928 the son of  Mr. Wakefield Trott and Mildred Hill Trott from Hamilton Parish. He attended school at Temperance Hall at Crawl hill. At age 14 he went to work to help support his family. he was a carpenter by trade but also worked at Pink beach Hotel and as a waiter at one point at the Mid-Ocean Club. George also helped his father on occasion with in his father’s Lime Kiln. George loved cricket and played his first match at age 17. It was here he began to establish himself as an outstanding player. He was classed as Bermuda’s best Umpire. He earned a reputation during his time as an early order batsman and seam bowler who occasionally took the new ball.  In  his earlier days he played cricket at Hamilton Parish in the 1960s’. He was a dependable early order batsman and a good bowler he was a very strict personality. His biggest contribution to local cricket was as an Umpire and his high standard earned him the respect of players and peers alike. He brought a lot of professionalism to the organisation Bermuda Cricket Umpires Association. Many up and coming umpires were taught their craft by Mr. Trott. He was the first Bermudian to officiate  in a world cup qualifier at the 1990 ICC trophy in the Netherlands and also stood in the middle in an unprecedented 11 successive “CUP MATCH’ classics. George was a great ambassador for Bermuda. He was honoured by the Bright Temple A.M.E  church for his service to Cup match. George left a legacy for the younger generation to follow. He left us on the same date as he arrived into this beautiful world on his 90th birthday  8th June 2018. Thank you George for your contribution to the sport of Cricket and to your country.

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